Category Archives: Business

What Did the GOP’s Tax Plan Revamp Actually Do for Small Businesses?

The new tax plan is a jolt for business, and not just corporate giants. Small businesses and other ‘pass-through’ entities are also benefiting.

In an article from Dallas News, author Tom Benning writes, “And while Republicans are staking that high-dollar tax cut on helping smaller businesses — with Jenkins, among others, planning to invest in facilities and hire more workers — the overall impact remains murky for many individual owners and the economy at large”.

In the article, Benning discusses:

  • Businesses as ‘pass-throughs’
  • Not all pass-throughs are small businesses
  • Pass-through businesses now earn more net income than C-corps

Benning continues, “One restriction, for instance, focuses on businesses where the ‘principal asset’ is the ‘reputation or skill of one or more of its employees or owners’. That definition has sent business owners, financial planners and accountants scrambling for clarity on what exactly it means”. What benefits from the tax plan do will your small business see?

To read more, see the full article from Tom Benning in Dallas News.

Interested in VC Funding? These 4 Statistics Tell You Exactly What You Need to Know

As an entrepreneur, if you are considering venture capital to fund your startup, be sure to study the state of your current market.

In an article from Entrepreneur, author Jayson DeMers writes, “For the past several years, the total dollar amount of VC given to startups has increased significantly, with venture capitalists showing increasing interest in new technologies and potential “unicorns” that could be valued at a billion dollars or more”.

In the article, DeMers discusses:

  • Total VC funding down 11%
  • The median deal size
  • Unicorn valuations
  • VC for AI and machine learning has nearly doubled

DeMers continues, “It’s still an exciting time to be a startup tech entrepreneur — though the dynamics are changing. But if VC is the direction in which you’re headed, you should stay up to date with the latest trends, and position yourself accordingly”.

To read more, see the full article from Jayson DeMers in Entrepreneur.

Five Big Business Trends to Watch in 2018

As 2018 begins, business owners are paying close attention to the trends that will impact their businesses. In an article from Fortune, author Alan Murray discusses five trends that he will be watching:

  • Recession watch
  • AI Advances
  • The tech backlash
  • The CEO Statesman
  • A changing workplace for women

How will these five trends impact your business? Are there more trends business leaders should be keeping an eye on?

To read more, see the full article from Alan Murray in Fortune.

Adaptability: The Most Valued Leadership Skill

Directing changes can be a difficult task for any business leader. As the business world evolves, what are some ways that companies are keeping up with the changes of consumers?

In an article from Disruption Hub, author Sally Henderson writes, “We are living in a world with unprecedented levels of change. Advances in technology, changes in consumer behaviour, and new business models are forcing organisations and individuals to make complex and often uncomfortable decisions on a daily basis”.

In the article, Henderson discusses:

  • Why change is important
  • 3 simple words that will help with changes
  • Adaptability

Henderson continues, “Be aware change is an energy hungry beast and a very demanding partner at times. To ensure consistent commitment enroll a great team of supporters into your world so you can stick with the plan when the going gets tough”. What business changes can you implement in your business? How will your customers respond?

To read more, see the full article from Sally Henderson in Disruption Hub.

Under New Tax Law, Should Your Business Restructure as a C Corporation?

As tax reform begins in America, many businesses might want to consider filing as a C corporation.

In an article from Inc., author Zoe Henry writes, “Most U.S. small businesses currently don’t qualify for the reduced corporate tax rate. The majority of small enterprises are structured as pass-through entities such as limited liability companies or S corporations, where profits are taxed according to the owner’s personal rate. While there is some tax relief in the bill for those pass-through firms–including a temporary ability to deduct up to 20 percent of income–many could access the permanent cut by converting to full-blown C corporations”.

In the article, Henry discusses:

  • A smart business decision
  • How long would it take to convert to a C corp?
  • Taking the time to reorganize and avoid being double taxed

Henry continues, “While the reduction to the maximum corporate tax rate is written as permanent, it could change, Reitmeyer points out. For instance, Democrats could retake a Senate majority, and vote through changes to the law. If that happens, it would be far more complicated to convert back to an S corporation or an LLC than the other way around”. Have you considered a C corporation for your business?

To read more, see the full article from Zoe Henry in Inc.

Congress Passes Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which was passed in both houses of Congress earlier this week, was signed into law by President Trump on December 22, 2017. The majority of the provisions contained in the sweeping reform legislation go into effect as of January 1, 2018. Read on for a few recommendations on actions to be taken before the end of 2017 followed by an overview of items included in the act.

Initial Recommendations:

For Individuals

  • Pay state income taxes due before December 31, 2017.
  • Accelerate your charitable contributions into 2017 since all brackets will benefit.
  • If you make charitable contributions to the athletic department of your favorite university in order to be entitled to purchase tickets to athletic events, definitely make those contributions before December 31, 2017.
  • Prepay 2% itemized deductions due (such as investment advisory fees, tax preparation fees, professional licenses, etc.) before December 31, 2017.
  • Prepare for additional estate gifting beginning January 1, 2018.

For Businesses

  • Consider a change of accounting methods for business below $25MM to a cash basis method or completed contract accounting (as opposed to percentage of completion)
  • Consider accelerating equipment purchases for immediate write-offs.
  • Close 1031 exchanges on personal property before 12-31-17
  • Pay for business entertainment in 2017
  • Pay for R&D expenditures in 2017
  • Consider timing of terminated partnerships—technical termination rules go away in 2018
  • Consider choice of business entity.

Items Affecting Individuals:

Tax Rates – The act keeps the seven tax brackets but reduces the rates for five of them. The new bracket rates are 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35%, and 37%. The maximum rate is for income above $600,000 married filing jointly and $300,000 for singles.

Standard Deduction and Personal Exemptions – The standard deduction is increased to $24,000 for married filing jointly and $12,000 for singles. Personal exemptions are repealed.

Mortgage Interest – The mortgage interest deduction is capped at interest on $750,000 of mortgage debt each for a principal residence and a second home. The deduction for interest on home equity lines of credit is repealed.

Taxes – The act puts a $10,000 cap on deductions in connection with state and local income, property, and sales taxes. It also provides that no deduction will be allowed in 2017 for prepayment of tax for years beginning after December 31, 2017.

Medical Expenses – The threshold for deducting medical expenses is temporarily reduced from 10% to 7.5% (for the 2017 and 2018 tax years only).

Child Tax Credit – The per-child tax credit is doubled, rising from $1,000 to $2,000 per qualifying child. The phase out threshold is increased to $400,000 for married filing jointly and $200,000 for those filing singly.

Credit for Non-Child Dependents – The act temporarily allows parents to take a $500 credit for each non-child dependent whom they support, such as a child 17 or older, an ailing elderly parent, or an adult child with a disability.

Pass-Through Income – The act includes a 20% deduction on Qualified Business Income from sole proprietors, S-Corporations, LLCS, and partnerships (subject to limitations).

Alternative Minimum Tax – The act reduces the number of filers who would be hit by this tax by raising the income exemption levels to $70,300 for singles and $109,400 for married filing jointly.

Affordable Care Act Individual Mandate – The individual mandate is repealed as of 2019.

College Athletic Fund Contributions – These contributions, made in exchange for preferential seating, are no longer deductible.

Alimony Deduction – This is repealed after 2018.

Estate Tax – This tax remains at 40% but the exemption is doubled to $10.98 million per individual.

Miscellaneous Tax Breaks – The act preserves some smaller, but popular, tax breaks, including deductions for student loan interest and classroom supplies bought with a teacher’s own money. It also keeps the tax-free status of tuition waivers for graduate students.

Items Affecting Businesses:

Corporate Tax Rate – The corporate tax rate is reduced from a top graduated rate of 35% to a flat 21%.

Corporate Alternative Minimum Tax – The act repeals this tax.

Full Expensing for Certain Business Assets – The bill provides 100% expensing of qualified property acquired and placed in service after September 27, 2017 and before January 1, 2023. It also increases (tenfold) the Sec. 179 expensing limitation ceiling and phase out threshold to $5 million and $20 million, respectively, both indexed for inflation.

Interest Expense – For tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, every business, regardless of its form, is generally subject to a disallowance of a deduction for net interest expense in excess of 30% of the business’s adjusted taxable income. Farming businesses can elect out of these rules if they use ADS to depreciate any property used in the farming business with a recovery period of ten years or more.

Net Operating Losses (NOL) – For NOLS arising in tax years ending after December 31, 2017, the two-year carryback and the special carryback provisions are repealed, so losses can only be carried forward. However, a two-year carryback applies in the case of certain losses incurred in the trade or business of farming.

Foreign Provisions – The act includes several international tax changes including a repatriation provision—US shareholders owning at least 10% of a foreign subsidiary will include in income the share of the post-1986 historical earnings and profits (E&P) of the foreign subsidiary, to the extent that E&P have not been previously subject to US tax. The portion of E&P attributable to cash or cash equivalents would be taxes at a 12% rate and the remainder would be taxed at a 5% rate.

Farms Property – For property placed in service after December 31, 2017, in tax years ending after that date, the cost recovery period is shortened from seven years to five years for any machinery or equipment (other than any grain bin, cotton ginning asset, fence, or other land improvement) used in a farming business, the original use of which commences with the taxpayer. Additionally, the required use of the 150% declining balance depreciation method for property used in a farming business (i.e., for 3-, 5-, 7-, and 10-year property) is repealed. The 150% declining balance method continues to apply to any 15-year or 20-year property used in the farming business to which the straight-line method does not apply, and to property for which the taxpayer elects the use of the 150% declining balance method.

Cash Method of Accounting – The act increases the cash accounting method applicability threshold for most business up to $25 million in revenue, including businesses with inventory.

Percentage of Completion Requirements – The act increases the percentage-of-completion method applicability threshold to business with average revenue of $25 million or more.

Deduction for Entertainment – This deduction is repealed; previously entertainment was 50% deductible.

Research and Development Expenses – Must be capitalized and amortized over five years.

Technical Termination of Partnership Rules – The act repeals these.

Inspiring the Disruptors of Tomorrow

With the widening talent gap in technology, it will be increasingly difficult for businesses to find an employment standard.

In an article from Disruption Hub, author Laura Cox writes, “As enterprises inevitably enter the digital age, employment requirements are changing. Unfortunately, the workforce often seems to be playing a game of catch up. The tech talent gap is hardly breaking news, last year KPMG’s annual CIO survey found that 65 per cent of technology leaders faced difficulties when hiring employees with relevant skills”.

In the article, Cox discusses:

  • Ins’PI’ring students
  • Relevant ideas for real world problems
  • A communal effort

Cox continues, “Creating events and competitions for young people could be instrumental in encouraging talent and diversity in the technological community”. Is your business looking to address the talent gap in technology? How will this talent gap impact your future employees?

To read more, see the full article from Laura Cox in Disruption Hub.

Tax Reform Proposals Released From White House, Congress; Next Steps Uncertain

Michael Blitstein

Michael Blitstein

by Michael W. Blitstein, CPA

Shortly before President Obama unveiled his proposed fiscal year 2015 Federal budget on March 4th, House Ways and Means Chair Dave Camp (R-Mich.), introduced a sweeping tax reform bill. While President Obama did not call for such a mammoth overhaul of the Tax Code as Camp did, the President did include many tax proposals in his budget, affecting individuals, businesses and tax administration.

In Camp’s bill, two greatly affected groups are taxpayers in high-tax states, who would be impacted by elimination of the deduction for state and local taxes, and corporations, which would benefit from a corporate tax cut, but one that would be partially paid for by higher taxes on small and mid-size businesses that are generally structured as pass-through entities.

Both the President and Camp quickly took to social media to promote their proposals. At a news conference, House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio), indicated it was unlikely Camp’s bill would come before the House for a vote. Republican support for many of the President’s proposals remains even less likely before mid-term elections.

Obama’s proposals

As in past budgets, President Obama proposed tax incentives for manufacturing, research, energy, and job creation. The President called for Congress to make permanent the research tax credit and expand incentives for employers to hire veterans. Carried interest would taxed as ordinary income and payroll taxes would be extended to cover distributions from certain pass-through entities engaged in a professional service business.

President Obama signaled a willingness to reduce the corporate tax rate but would require the elimination of some business incentives, particularly tax preferences for fossil fuels, in exchange. The President also proposed a number of international and insurance taxation reforms.

For individuals, President Obama proposed to enhance the earned income credit (EIC) for individuals without children and noncustodial parents, and make permanent the American Opportunity Tax Credit. The President also proposed to reduce the value of certain tax expenditures for higher income individuals.

Camp’s bill

Camp’s bill would replace the current seven individual income tax rate brackets (10, 15, 25, 28, 33, 35, and 39.6 percent) with three rates: 10, 25 and 35 percent. In addition, many incentives for individuals would be repealed, including the state and local tax deduction, the itemized deduction for medical expenses, the adoption credit, deduction for alimony payments, the deduction for higher education tuition, and residential energy credits. A few incentives would be enhanced, such as the child tax credit.

Two popular individual incentives—the home mortgage interest deduction and the charitable contribution deduction—would survive under Camp’s plan but in modified form.

Camp’s bill would gradually reduce the corporate tax rate to 25 percent. Few targeted business tax incentives would survive. Camp’s plan eliminates the Work Opportunity Tax Credit, many energy-related incentives, the rules for like-kind exchanges, and more. However, Code Section 179 small business expensing would be enhanced. The research tax credit would be retained but modified.

CJBS, LLC is a Chicago based firm that assists its clients with a wide range of accounting and financial issues, protecting and expanding the value of mid-size companies. E-mail me at michael@cjbs.com if you have any questions about this posting or if I may be of assistance in any way.

www.cjbs.com

Payroll Tax Services – Who is Responsible to the IRS?

by Larry Goldsmith, C.P.A., J.D., C.F.F.A.

As a Forensic CPA, I often hear stories about clients or their partners, employees, or spouses who have stolen or have hidden assets. But there’s one scam which you don’t hear about very often and which should scare every business owner: what happens when your trusted payroll service fails to make your tax payments to the IRS?

Just today a small business owner confessed to me that his payroll service stole $7 million from him and other businesses. The payroll service collected tax monies from their clients, and instead of making the payments to the IRS, the owners of the service simply pocketed the money. The trusting small business owner was required to pay the IRS nearly $40,000; in effect paying the payroll tax obligation twice.

Who is responsible?

More and more we hear about trusted people and businesses stealing from their clients and associates. Violation of fiduciary responsibility inevitably escalates during periods of economic hardship, but the potential to be a victim of ‘white collar crime’ is always present. As a business owner, it is important to continually verify that employees and business partners are doing what is expected of them.

Who is responsible in the case of non-payment of payroll taxes when a payroll service has been engaged? The Internal Revenue Service regulations state quite clearly:

  • The employer is ultimately responsible for the deposit of Federal tax liabilities.
  • The employer is liable even if a third party payer fails to make the payroll tax deposits in a timely manner.
  • It is the employer, not the payroll service, who is liable for unpaid taxes, penalties and interest.
  • The employer has a duty to review their EFTPS account to verify that the third party payer actually paid the taxes.

An ounce of prevention is always worth the proverbial pound of cure.  To avoid the headaches and financial distress of misplaced trust, CJBS recommends that business owners follow this Five Step Anti-Swindle procedure:

  1. Examine checks clearing the bank accounts monthly.
  2. Have someone verify payroll tax deposit credits on-line.
  3. Examine customer credit memos regularly.
  4. Examine delinquent accounts receivable.
  5. Spot check cash payments.

CJBS, LLC is a Chicago based firm that assists its clients with a wide range of accounting and financial issues, protecting and expanding the value of mid-size companies. E-mail me at larry@cjbs.com if you have any questions about this posting or if I may be of assistance in any way.

IRS Expands Its Fresh Start Initiative; Provides Penalty and Installment Payment Relief

by Michael W. Blitstein, CPA 

The IRS announced enhancements to its “Fresh Start” initiative by providing higher dollar thresholds for using the streamlined application process for installment agreements and new penalty relief for qualified individuals affected by the economy in 2011. The IRS doubled the dollar threshold amount and increased the maximum term for streamlined installment agreements. Unemployed taxpayers, if they file their returns after April 17th, and the self-employed may be eligible for late payment penalty relief. The agency has updated its online materials about the Fresh Start initiative to reflect the new relief.

Fresh Start

The IRS launched its Fresh Start initiative in early 2011 to help taxpayers affected by the economic slowdown. The IRS modified its lien policies by increasing the lien-filing threshold to $10,000 from $5,000 and by creating a process in which a lien will be released if the taxpayer qualifies for a direct-debit installment agreement. Additionally, it eased and streamlined installment agreements to make them available to more small businesses. Small businesses with an outstanding tax liability balance of $25,000 or less are able to apply for an installment agreement without providing a financial statement and financial verification. Additionally, they could apply for up to 60 months to pay off their outstanding tax liability.

Installment Agreements

Effective immediately, the IRS has raised the threshold amount for using the streamlined installment agreement without having to provide a financial statement or verification from an outstanding tax liability of $25,000 or less to a balance due of $50,000 or less. The agency also increased the maximum term for streamlined installment agreements from the current 60 months to 72 months.

Taxpayers must agree to direct-debit payments. Under the Direct Debit Installment Agreement (DDIA) system, funds are automatically debited from a taxpayer’s bank account for the agreed upon installment amount.

Taxpayers should file Form 9465-F, Installment Agreement Request, but do not need to provide a financial statement, Form 433-A, Collection Information Statement for Wage Earners and Self-Employed Individuals, or Form 433-F, Collection Information Statement. Taxpayers seeking installment agreements exceeding $50,000 will still need to furnish a financial statement. Taxpayers must also pay down their balance due if over $50,000 to take advantage of the expanded streamlined program.

Penalty Relief

Taxpayers normally have until April 17, 2012, to file their 2011 tax returns and pay any tax due. Taxpayers requesting an extension of time to file have until October 15, 2012, to file their 2011 returns. This year, certain unemployed and self-employed taxpayers may be eligible for a six-month grace period on failure-to-pay penalties. Penalty relief is available to the following two groups of taxpayers:

  • Wage earners who have been unemployed at least 30 consecutive days during 2011 or in 2012 up to the April 17th deadline for filing a Federal tax return this year.
  • Self-employed individuals who experienced a 25 percent or greater reduction in business income in 2011 due to the economy.

The taxpayer’s 2011 calendar year balance must not exceed $50,000. Additionally, the taxpayer’s income must not exceed $200,000 if he or she files a joint return or $100,000 if he or she files as single or head of household.

The request for relief from the failure to pay penalty is only available for tax year 2011 and only if all taxes, interest and any other penalties are paid in full by October 15, 2012.

Generally, taxpayers who fail to pay taxes owed by the original due date are subject to a failure to pay penalty of 0.5 percent of the unpaid taxes for each month or part of a month after the due date that the taxes are not paid. The penalty can reach 25 percent of the unpaid taxes. Thus, under this program, taxpayers will have until October 15, 2012, to avoid the penalty.

The IRS is legally required to continue to charge interest at the current annual rate of three percent on the unpaid tax liability. It does not have the authority to waive statutorily imposed interest. Taxpayers should note that the failure to file penalty remains in effect at 5 percent a month with a 25 percent cap.

Offers in Compromise

The IRS also reminded taxpayers that the expanded streamline Offer in Compromise (OIC) program, one of the first Fresh Start Initiative, is still available. The streamlined OIC application is available to more taxpayers, has fewer financial document requirements, and, most importantly to struggling taxpayers, a greater flexibility and more common-sense approach to determining feasibility of collection.

CJBS, LLC is a Chicago based firm that assists its clients with a wide range of accounting and financial issues, protecting and expanding the value of mid-size companies. E-mail me at michael@cjbs.com if you have any questions about this posting or if I may be of assistance in any way.

www.cjbs.com